Reality is Wondrously Complex

From the atoms in my coffee (Mmmm Union Roast – actually now my Harveys Elizabethan Ale 😉 — typos courtesy of the latter) to the interactions of individuals that collectively define the earths eco-system, and on a smaller scale human societies; reality is wondrously complex. To cope with this we create abstractions. The abstractions we create, and an understanding of the dependencies between these abstractions allow us – to some degree – make sense of reality. In some quite old posts (2008 no less!), I investigated the relationship between abstraction and complexity; see Complexity part I  & Complexity part II. Being a physicist by training I tend to regress back to this world view whenever I’m allowed ;-). However the arguments are generic and relevant to software and IT operational ‘complexity’.

Abstraction is not the same as virtualisation. Abstraction allows us to describe the essential characteristics of entities that we care about (coffee – ‘smooth’, ale – ‘malty’); without being troubled by their internal structures. Abstractions ‘simplify’. Abstractions encapsulate complexity. Virtualisation on the other hand attempts to create an alternative reality; one that is ideally as close as possible to the physical reality which it replaces and which also underpins it. As the purpose is to replicate reality, virtualisation does not encapsulate complexity.

As many now realise, having learn’t the hard way, virtualisation does not simplify.

Yet while we interpret the natural world through a self-consistent hierarchy of highly modular structural abstractions; we have been slow to adopt the structural abstractions required to address environmental complexity and the associated challenge of maintaining these environments.

Necessity is the Mother of Invention

The economic realities we face in 2013 will, I suggest, drive some long overdue changes. Fixation with virtualisation, and/or the latest and greatest ‘Cloud’ stack will wane, and organisations will regain some perspective. The ability to virtualise resource will remain a useful tool in the arsenal of enterprise technologies; but don’t expect too much of it. Virtualisation has failed to deliver the simplicity, operational savings and business agility promised by vendor marketing messages. In all honesty, virtualisation never could. The post virtualised world is more complex and risk prone than its physical predecessor; this the trade off made for increasing resource utilisation while shying away from addressing monolithic applications which are the root cause of most of our ills.

This is why OSGi is so important. An open industry specification, OSGi directly address the fundamental issue of structural modularity; encapsulating complexity and providing a powerful dependency management mechanism. Increasing not only Java; activities with the OSGi Alliance have started to address C/C++ and other languages.

The next generation of adaptive business platform, whether classified as private or public cloud environments; will need to be modular, will need to understand modularity applications, will need to manage all the forms of run time dependency, will need to be OSGi based.

Through our contributions to the OSGi Alliance, our sponsorship of the bndtools project and the OSGi Community and UK Forum, and above all the ongoing development of the Paremus Service Fabric – the industries first OSGi based Cloud runtime; from the developer IDE to the Cloud runtime, Paremus remain committed to delivering this vision. We hope that more of you join us in 2013.

In the meantime I’d like to wish you seasonal best wishes and peace, happiness and health for the coming year.

Richard & The Paremus Team.