A Little Early

Whilst recently writing up a white paper, I idly spent sometime looking through my usual archive – the Internet (anything to avoid writing). :-/

When did we (Paremus) first announce distributed OSGi again? Answer, not 2009 as one believe if you listened to all the IT vendor noise about RFC119 – but in December 16th 2005.

OK – we were a little early 🙂

This press release even had a quote from Jon Bostrom. Jon, six years early in 1998 actually visited Salomon Brothers UK to provide a Jini train course too, what turned out to be, a proto-Paremus team.

This morning I was alerted to a blog concerning Jini and OSGi which I dually half-read, then responded. Then realized that the blogger had actually reference a short 5 minute talk I gave at the Brussels JCM 10 Jini event September 2006. As the message from this presentation had been ignored by the community since that point – I has somewhat surprised / pleased to see it referenced.

My message at the time was simple and quite unpopular…

To survive and flourish Jini must embrace OSGi

The other thing that sprang to mind was Jim Waldo’s presentation at the same conference. Unlike mine, this widely report with great enthusiasm; I really don’t mind Jim:)

The interesting thing was – at least to my mind – one of Jim’s most profound comments seemed to be missed by most.

Program v.s. Deploy – we’ll put the management in later

This struck particular resonance with the Paremus engineering team – as our dynamic target state provisioning sub-system for Infiniflow had been released earlier that very year. This leveraging those very ideas!

Its now 2009 – we have the industry has defined the relevant required standards for distributed OSGi based frameworks. Now the industry is wondering how to develop, deploy and manage runtimes that consist of 1000’s of dynamical deployed bundles running on a Cloud of Compute resource.

No problem! Paremus have been doing that for half a decade 😉

Conclusions? Nothing profound. Perhaps the slow pace of the IT industry? But isn’t the Internet a great communal memory!